You asked: Where did the Hail Holy Queen prayer come from?

Where did the Hail Mary prayer come from?

The prayer is based on two biblical episodes featured in the Gospel of Luke: the Angel Gabriel’s visit to Mary (the Annunciation), and Mary’s subsequent visit to Elisabeth, the mother of John the Baptist (the Visitation).

What is the meaning of the Hail Holy Queen prayer?

the “Hail, Holy Queen” is a salutation deprecatonia, a greeting of petition and intercession. Mary is called mother of mercy because Christ her Son, is the incarnation of God’s love and mercy.

WHO said the first line of the Hail Mary prayer?

In 1555, a Dutch Jesuit named Petrus Canisius added these words to his catechism: “Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.” By the time of the Council of Trent eleven years later, this sentence, and some new words, had been added to the Hail Mary.

When was the rosary created?

According to Catholic tradition, the rosary was instituted by the Blessed Virgin Mary herself. In the 13th century, she is said to have appeared to St. Dominic (founder of the Dominicans), given him a rosary, and asked that Christians pray the Hail Mary, Our Father and Glory Be prayers instead of the Psalms.

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Where is the rosary in the Bible?

They are not in the bible but can be related to Mary’s station at the foot of the Cross as refuge of hope. 6) Finally, the “Glory be to the Father” makes direct reference to the Trinity. It is not mentioned as such in the Bible but nobody would question Father, Son and Spirit and the praise due to them.

Who formed the Hail Mary?

The closing petition came into general use during the 14th or 15th century and received its official formulation in the reformed breviary of Pope Pius V in 1568. Of the many musical settings of the prayer, the Ave Maria of Franz Schubert is perhaps the most widely known.

Who invented the rosary and why?

Dominic, founder of the Dominican order in the early 13th century. The devotion probably developed gradually as a substitute for the recitation of the Psalms or for the divine office sung by monks at the various canonical hours each day.