What does the Living Church of God believe?

What is the belief of the Living Church of God?

Doctrines. LCG believes that the Bible is God’s inspired revelation to mankind, and as such is complete and inerrant in its original form.

Does the United Church of God believe in the Trinity?

UCG does not believe in the Trinity. It believes that this was also a wrong idea that was later mixed into the teaching of the Bible. Instead, it believes that the Bible teaches that the Holy Spirit is the spirit/power of God and of Christ Jesus and is not a separate person.

What is wrong with the Worldwide Church of God?

Under Armstrong’s leadership, the Worldwide Church of God was accused of being a pseudo-Christian cult with unorthodox and, to most Christians, heretical teachings. Critics also contended that the WCG did not proclaim salvation by grace through faith alone, but rather required works as part of salvation.

What day does the Church of God worship?

Like the Seventh Day Baptists and the Seventh-day Adventist Church, the Churches of God (Seventh Day) observe Sabbath, the seventh day of the week (Saturday).

Who is Richard Ames?

Richard Ames (19??-present): Former Registrar of Ambassador University; Co-host of The World Tomorrow, 1986–1994; now resides in Charlotte, NC; he co-hosts Tomorrow’s World for the Living Church of God. … Now founder of Guardian Ministries and leader of the Church of God Southern California based in Pasadena.

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What is Armstrong religion?

Armstrongism is the teachings and doctrines of Herbert W. Armstrong while leader of the Worldwide Church of God (WCG). … The religion is a blend of Christian fundamentalism, non-belief in the Trinity and some tenets of Judaism and Seventh-Day Sabbath doctrine.

Does the Church of God believe in communion?

We believe every person can be restored to fellowship with God through accepting Christ’s offer of forgiveness and salvation. We believe in Water Baptism by immersion after salvation and Holy Communion as a symbolic remembrance of Christ’s suffering and death for our salvation.