Quick Answer: Did Greeks change the Bible?

Did Greek mythology influence the Bible?

Sorry, Jesus, but ancient Greek myths inspired the writing of the Old and New Testament of the Bible. … The Christian religion is based on a Bible made up of an Old Testament and New Testament. These two Testaments are also made up of many other books (a few pages) filled with stories, philosophies, and instructions.

Did Greece influence Christianity?

The purpose of this article is to explain how Christianity was highly influenced by elements of Greek language and culture. … Back to the Hebrews and the Greeks we find that the former strongly believed in their one God, Jehovah, whose existence and laws comprised that sacred writings called Torah in Hebrew.

Is Christianity based on Greek mythology?

Greek Mythology. Christianity came in the 1st CE century, while the mythology existed for millennia before Christianity, with its roots (namely the sorcery traditions of Europe) going back to even 80,000 BCE. The common European belief system evolved into different regional branches (Greek, Norse, Celtic, etc.)

Is the Bible Hebrew or Greek?

The books of the Christian New Testament are widely agreed to have originally been written in Greek, specifically Koine Greek, even though some authors often included translations from Hebrew and Aramaic texts. Certainly the Pauline Epistles were written in Greek for Greek-speaking audiences.

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Who is Zeus in Bible?

Zeus is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion, who rules as king of the gods of Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first element of his Roman equivalent Jupiter.

Zeus
Parents Cronus and Rhea
Siblings Hestia, Hades, Hera, Poseidon and Demeter; Chiron
Consort Hera, various others

Is there any mention of the Greek gods in the Bible?

The deities mentioned in the Book of Acts by name are Zeus, Hermes, Artemis, and the Dioskouroi. Acts 14:8–13 describes an incident that supposedly occurred during Paul and Barnabas’s visit to the Greek city of Lystra in the region of Lykaonia in Asia Minor. … He listened to Paul as he was speaking.