Your question: Who spread Christianity in Europe?

Who spread Christianity?

Beginning with the son of a Jewish carpenter, the religion was spread around the world first by Jesus’s disciples, then by emperors, kings, and missionaries. Through crusades, conquests, and simple word of mouth, Christianity has had a profound influence on the last 2,000 years of world history.

What was France’s religion before Christianity?

Before the spread of Christianity into Europe, the Gallic people of France practiced faiths descended from Indo-European traditions. This Celtic religion recognized a polytheistic pantheon, though relatively little is known about its deities and customs.

How did Christianity spread to Germany?

Christianity is the largest religion in Germany. It was introduced to the area of modern Germany by 300 AD, while parts of that area belonged to the Roman Empire, and later, when Franks and other Germanic tribes converted to Christianity from the 5th century onwards.

How did Christianity spread to Italy?

Christianity arrived on the Italian peninsula in the first century, probably by unknown travelers, traders or soldiers. The Letter to the Romans of Paul the Apostle is addressed and attests to the presence of Roman Christians in the first century. Christians in Rome were also in touch with St. Peter and St.

What caused Christianity to spread?

Ehrman attributes the rapid spread of Christianity to five factors: (1) the promise of salvation and eternal life for everyone was an attractive alternative to Roman religions; (2) stories of miracles and healings purportedly showed that the one Christian God was more powerful than the many Roman gods; (3) Christianity …

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How did Christianity spread in America?

Christianity was introduced to the Americas as it was first colonized by Europeans beginning in the 16th and 17th centuries. Immigration further increased Christian numbers. Going forward from its foundation, the United States has been called a Protestant nation by a variety of sources.