What is the Day of Atonement in Christianity?

What is Atonement in Christianity?

atonement, the process by which people remove obstacles to their reconciliation with God. It is a recurring theme in the history of religion and theology.

Why is atonement important in Christianity?

Atonement is important because the atoning death of God’s Son was the only way to bring salvation to humanity. For liberal Christians their understanding of the atonement makes it important because it inspires them to live a good Christian life, and living the Christian life will bring them salvation.

What did Jesus say about atonement?

The Savior was able to receive this power and carry out the Atonement because He kept Himself free from sin: “He suffered temptations but gave no heed unto them” (Doctrine and Covenants 20:22). Having lived a perfect, sinless life, He was free from the demands of justice.

What is meant by the Day of Atonement?

Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement—is considered the most important holiday in the Jewish faith. … According to tradition, it is on Yom Kippur that God decides each person’s fate, so Jews are encouraged to make amends and ask forgiveness for sins committed during the past year.

Why is the atonement so important?

Our Savior’s Atonement made resurrection possible so all of us will live again after we die. It also made it possible for us to be clean from our sins if we repent. As part of His Atonement, Jesus suffered challenges of every kind so He could know how to help us feel better when we are sad or struggling.

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What is an act of atonement?

When you apologize for doing something wrong, that’s an act of atonement. Many religions have rituals of atonement, such as Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, on which people of the Jewish faith repent for their sins.

Where did the word atonement come from?

The word comes (in the early 16th century, denoting unity or reconciliation, especially between God and man), from at one + the suffix -ment, influenced by medieval Latin adunamentum ‘unity’, and earlier onement from an obsolete verb one ‘to unite’. Day of Atonement another term for Yom Kippur.